• December 3, 2016

    Mom Was Right, You Do Have A Halo!

    Mom was right, you do have a halo ::  To be clear, this is not a post talking about a religious halo or your spiritual aura – although, that is more than likely what your mom was referring to!!  But for now, what I’m talking about is the halo that your reputation has created around you and the impact it can have on not only your current state, but more importantly your future opportunities. Why do halos matter, especially now? Simple. Halos work off of the power of association.  Make no mistake, association has power and value.  Social Media channels have created a never-before-seen level of transparency making it incredibly easy for people and brands to better understand with whom they are interested in associating. I’ve seen the power of this first-hand throughout my career in motorsports.  Our world is all about the association between drivers, teams and brands.  For many years, my sole focus was on how to build positive association between drivers and their sponsors through public relations and marketing programs – building platforms to drive association and connection with fans.  The foundation for these types of partnerships is rooted in authentically aligning brand and values attributes with the athlete, which establishes credibility in the eyes of consumers. The power of association … → 84% of employees would consider leaving their current job if offered a job by a company with an excellent reputation → 69% of job seekers would not take a job with a company that has a bad reputation – even if unemployed → 100% of your referrals are based on reputation → 100% of your employees are your reputation ambassadors We often see the halo effect at work when it comes to brand and brand ambassador relationships.  If an ambassador acts in a manner that would negatively impact the brand, because of their association, you’ll generally see the brand quickly and publicly distance or disassociate itself because of the unfavorable publicity halo and adverse business impact it would create.  Can you think of any examples of this??  Does Subway and Jared Fogle come to mind? How about Tiger Woods and Gatorade? Do you remember Michael Phelps and Kellogg after the images of Phelps using a bong were released?  Does the name Ryan Lochte ring a bell? Then there is Kate Moss and H&M when she was publicly exposed for using cocaine.  H&M was quick to sever the relationship and issued a short statement related to what kind of person should represent their brand – “If someone is going to be the face of H&M. It is important they be healthy, wholesome and sound.” In the case of Subway, it’s disassociation with Fogle was quick, to the point and delivered via Social Media channels – “We no longer have a relationship with Jared and have no further comment.” One of the most iconic examples of corporate partners racing away from an ambassador is Lance Armstrong. Shortly after his admission of doping, bullying and lying, his corporate partners dropped the once legend of bike racing. The power of the halo is a two-way street, whether it’s an individual, corporation, franchise or a university. […]

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  • November 11, 2016

    Is Your Customer Service Killing Your Brand?

    Is Your Customer Service Killing Your Brand? Customer relationships, retention, growth and referrals are vital links for any brand’s success in today’s Reputation Economy.  However, it only takes one negative experience to wipe-away the relational equity that had built up and for their business (money and loyalty) to go elsewhere.  Not to even mention the negative impact to your brand if/when the experience is shared via Social Channels. In my opinion, customer service representatives need proactive empowerment, upgraded training and more resources from their leaders to reshape the reputation that this particular group has developed – whether it was honestly earned or they are guilty by association! Customer service must be a mindset that transcends all organizational departments.  New idea? Nope.  But, think about some of your recent experiences in this area? Was that indeed a mindset? Did you get the sense that the person was empowered to make a positive impact? But here’s the reality – We are ALL in the customer service business!  From the top to the bottom and everywhere in between. Below are two stories that I believe illustrate the points above from two different perspectives – one being from the front-line employee and the other a more traditional customer service scenario with two completely different outcomes. The $6,000 Egg: Todd Duncan tells a phenomenal story about he and his wife’s experience at a local restaurant at which they were regulars and also used the facility for corporate events. As the story goes, Todd makes a simple request to add a fried egg to his hamburger, but is repeatedly told by the server that they can’t fulfill his request because they may run out of eggs for the day’s special. His disbelief turns to dismay when he starts to calculate how much money he, his wife and his company have spent at this specific restaurant, which he estimated to be roughly $6,000 in one year!  And he still can’t get a 35-cent egg for his burger! This is a great example of how a front-line associate, representing the brand, was not able (or perhaps not empowered) to make a choice or decision that would have delighted a valuable customer – and in today’s terms, a valuable customer is someone who is spending money with you, period.  He no longer goes to that restaurant nor takes his corporate business there either. How Lego Builds Legendary Reputation: When you are 7 years old and love Legos, they are your world. Legos can be the cradle of imagination, creativity and expression. But, when you lose your favorite Lego character, it can force you to do something as a child that many adults, if given the choice between dealing with customer service or preparing their own taxes, would say, “where are those receipts?” Customer Service, a necessary evil in many minds, a place where we go to wait on hold or worse yet, get bounced around to different departments in search of some type of resolution. We Are All In The Customer Service Business!   So, young Luka emails Lego customer service and explains his situation unaware of the crap-shoot peril in which he just placed himself! However, […]

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  • October 5, 2016

    3 Unique Reputation Perspectives from Seth Godin

      If you haven’t heard of Seth Godin and you have even the slightest interest in leadership development, please do yourself a favor and go to his website and explore – you can thank me later. For those of you who absolutely are familiar with Seth and his work, then you know the value of his insights, messages and self-actualization themes. He is, without doubt, one of the greatest resources for leaders and entrepreneurs striving for success. In a recent blog post titled ‘Three things to keep in mind about your reputation,’ he gives 3 unique reputation perspectives. Salient points that capture the power (and personal responsibility) of establishing and nurturing one of your greatest assets for success in both your career and life. Below are his three points from the post, followed by my related thoughts. 3 unique reputation perspectives from Seth Godin: 1. Your reputation has as much impact on your life as what you actually do. 2. Early assumptions about you are sticky and are difficult to change. 3. The single best way to maintain your reputation is to do things you’re proud of. Gaming goes only so far. What I love about Seth’s perspective is that it crisply captures 3 essential aspects of building and maintaining your personal reputation. Let’s break it down: 1. Your reputation has as much impact on your life as what you actually do. I read this as the ability your reputation has to impact your life beyond the work that you actually do or the things you create. Your reputation impacts the referrals that come your way (or pass you by), the people who seek you out (or seek someone else) or the doors of opportunity that open (or close). Yes, it is important to keep doing good things, good works, good turns daily. Those actions, consistently over time, will continue to reinforce your reputation for what you do. Consider that 65% of new business comes from referrals – a key indicator of people seeking you out just as much for who you are, as for what you do. I don’t know of any entrepreneurs, business leaders or executives who don’t see referrals as a significant component of their sales matrix. 2. Early assumptions about you are sticky and are difficult to change. Have you ever heard the phrase, “you never get a second chance to make a first impression”? The first impression is a vital time stamp in reputation development. However, Seth uses a key word ‘assumptions’ that makes his thought different. People may have preconceived biases or assumptions about you before you even say a word or shake a hand. This may have come from someone else’s comments about you, perhaps the company at which you work, the clothes you wear, the car you drive, maybe even the university you attended (or didn’t attend). People rarely enter into a relationship without some initial bias or assumption. That’s ok. Resist the urge to try and prove people’s assumptions wrong. If that is your approach, then you might as well just spend your time playing the carnival game ‘whack-a-mole’. The game […]

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  • September 26, 2016

    2 Critical Actions that Saved Belmont University’s Reputation

    2 Critical Actions that Saved Belmont University’s Reputation:  When leaders or brands find themselves in the middle of a crisis there are two critical elements to remember in order to protect a reputation – time and decisive action. I’ve worked through my share of crisis situations over the past two decades – ranging from race car driver deaths to sponsor/brand crisis – and employed two vital components for successfully managing through those reputation challenges. Belmont University nailed both of them when the school was pulled into a social conversation by one of its students who posted a racially charged post on Snapchat. Click on the link below to read more from the New York Daily News. http://www.nydailynews.com/sports/football/belmont-boots-student-called-protesting-eagles-n-word-article-1.2799746 Below are 2 critical actions that saved Belmont University’s reputation. Time is not on your side Time is not on your side when assessing and beginning to manage a crisis situation. The Belmont University communications team quickly acknowledged, via the university’s Facebook page, that the administration was aware of the social post. Belmont University’s Facebook statement at 11:43 AM: “This morning, we were made aware of a racist social media post by a freshman student at Belmont. We reject comments rooted in racism or bigotry. This is not free speech – this is hate speech. The University is investigating and will take immediate action. As a Christian institution, it is our goal to build a diverse and inclusive community where all members feel accepted, safe and valued.” Acknowledgment, especially in today’s socially connected world, is a critical step in the timeline of reputation management. In fact, the expectation is that a brand or leader will respond through Social Media channels in a matter of hours. A response that takes too long can be considered to be avoidance or disinterest by the leader, organization or brand. Decisive Action is Necessary Theodore Roosevelt once said, “In any moment of decision, the best thing you can do is the right thing, the next best thing is the wrong thing, and the worst thing you can do is nothing.” While the crisis-management clock is ticking, the social-media monster is still feeding – people are watching social timelines for updates, posting comments and armchair quarterbacking what should be done. While it is beneficial to monitor what is being said, those comments should never guide your actions and next steps. The best way to chart the path towards action is to ‘check in’ with your values. Does your action plan align with your values? If so, move forward. Now. If not and you choose to proceed, then you are opening yourself (or company) up to additional scrutiny and reputation damage beyond the initial issue. It’s time to put your plan into action once you have evaluated and selected a values-based decision. Now that your decision has been made, you must see it through. Anything less is indecisive and will undermine your efforts. Belmont University’s Facebook Update at 1:22 PM (less than 2 hours later): “After investigating a racist social media post that surfaced earlier today, we can report that the person involved is no longer a student at Belmont. […]

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